Posted by: chartroose | April 23, 2008

Happy World Book Day!

I’ve never paid much attention to World Book Day, but now that I’m more into books and authors than ever before (largely because of this blog), I’m going to celebrate by creating a challenge for myself.  Here it is:

  1. Find a world map, close my eyes, and place my finger on a random country, continent or landmass of some kind.
  2. Interlibrary loan (or purchase) a novel written by an author from my randomly chosen geographical location.  If there are no translations that I can find, I’ll repeat steps 1 & 2 until I find one.
  3. Read and review the novel.

The British Isles are excluded because I read British authors all the time, so it wouldn’t be much of a challenge unless I decided to read James Joyce.  Then it would be TOO MUCH of a challenge. 

Okey-Dokey, here goes  —  the country that I’m going to read is…Greece!  Awesome!  I’m going to try to choose a contemporary Greek author.  I’m past my Homer, Sophocles and Euripedes stages of development, so none of that stuff is allowed.  Oh, and no mythology either!  (Drats!)

——————————————————————————(Approx. 45 minutes later…)  Okay, this was kind of difficult, but I finally found one listed at a local academic library.

Here is the book:

Woot!  I’m looking forward to this!  Maybe I’ll start reading more world literature and continue to expand my horizons. 

Advertisements

Responses

  1. With all the hoopla around Earth Day yesterday, I didn’t even know there was a World Book Day, let alone that it is today. I’m on a golf novel spree right now (just finished Lifetime Loser by James Ross, so I think I’ll adapt your challenge and see how many I can find set in different countries.

    Thanks for expanding my horizons, and Happy World Book Day to you! 🙂

  2. lol about Joyce 😀

    What a cool idea. I hope you enjoy The Daughter!

  3. Thanks Ruthie and Nymeth!

    You know, I’ve been kind of narrow-minded about the types of literature I read, and I’ve shied-away from translations because I figure there is always too much of the prose lost in there somewhere. It’s time to get over this because even if there is a little bit lost in translation, the writing still might be really good.

  4. Why, Happy World Book Day to you, too! Can’t wait to hear what you think of THe Daughter. The cover is great.

  5. What a great exercise to find a book! It’s like a treasure hunt. Hope you love it…

  6. Excellent idea! I’m going to try and get to this as well, even if I have missed the actual day. It’s never too late to be adventurous in your reading!

  7. Hi Bridget!

    I’ve already chosen my next place, and it’s Finland. I’ll wait a couple of months and then read a Finnish novel. After that, who knows?

  8. The British Isles are excluded because I read British authors all the time, so it wouldn’t be much of a challenge unless I decided to read James Joyce.

    Psst! James Joyce wasn’t British. 😉

    the country that I’m going to read is…Greece!

    You know, looking at my shelves I think I only have one contemporary novel from Greecy myself: Stolen Time by Vangelis Hatzyannidis. We’ll see what you make of this one.

    I’ve already chosen my next place, and it’s Finland.

    Ooh!. A few names that sprint to the tongue are Tove Jansson, Arto Paasilinna, Rosa Liksom, and Johanna Sinisalo. Someone, I’m sure, posted on my world literature forum a link to a website listing all Finnish books in English but I can’t, for the life of me, find it right now, otherwise I;d link to it.

    Maybe I’ll start reading more world literature and continue to expand my horizons.

    Well, if you do, remember you are always welcome to come to the above linked forum and pick up some ideas.

  9. Thank you Stewart! You’re the greatest help. I’m going to run over to your world literature forum right now to take a look. I didn’t even know you had a world literature forum! You must advertise these things, you know!

    I know James Joyce wasn’t British. I don’t think any of us are quite sure what he was ( :

  10. I didn’t even know you had a world literature forum! You must advertise these things, you know!

    Well, I sort of did. And then the Literary Saloon mentioned it, followed by Three Percent, and then some other blogs.

  11. Stewart — I’ll have to visit these sites too.

  12. […] Online Book Club) 43. herding cats (Blogging My Books) 44. Django Reinhardt 45. A.S. Byatt 46. Homer (Chartroose) (The next three are suggestions from Dewey’s son.) 47. ROFL 48. cheezburger […]

  13. […] Homer Chartroose: I’m past my Homer, Sophocles and Euripedes stages of development, so none of that stuff is […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: